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Monday, August 12, 2013

A Prairie Schooner is more than a wagon

imageAs we prepare to launch towards the great continental divide I am frequently reminded of the pioneering settlers of America. They had not been there and done that but each was surely waking each morning stressing but excited about the unknown prospects that lay before them.

They were also probably sore from using muscles that many did not know they had before beginning these preparations. Everyone from outlaws to accountants and farmers to financiers had to do a lot of very physical, mental and emotional activities to get “on the road”.  This has been no less true for us and we count the last few days before “D”eparture day!  Each is filled with “Did you fix xyz?” “Have you filled abc?”  “Where are my glasses?”

We have been planning and working towards this “D” day since the late 1990s…. and perhaps even longer than that.  It has been an individual dream of ours much of our lives. When we actually made the decision to choose the Full-Time RVing lifestyle as a transition to our ultimate retirement life we knew very little about it other than our mutually and frequently expressed love of the Great Northwest and the mountains.image  Heck, we got married in Boulder, Colorado in 1979 and spent our honeymoon in the Tetons around Jackson Hole, Wyoming. One does not get much more of a Rocky Mountain high than that.

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Here, in Champaign, Illinois, not many miles from great jump off points of the pioneers, like Nauvoo, IL and St Louis, MO we see the wide western horizon, incredible sunsets and feel the tug of the unknown journey ahead of us.

Are we scared?  Sure!  Are we excited? Certainly but we are also humbled when we think what it must have been like for all those pioneers and settlers that went from the conceptual security of a fixed community of family, friends and convenience to launch into a vast and unknown life with little more than a wagon load of hopes and dreams.

I have to wonder, how many of them worried about the technical aspects of their wagons, the welfare and maintenance of their horses and their own personal safety?  I am sure they had heard many stories about possible attacks from Indians and outlaws and the threat of an early winter had to always be hanging over their preparations.  Should I wait until next year and get an earlier start?  Should I bring warmer clothes? Will I need a gun, … a toothbrush? 

imageWhatever their choices, their solutions had to fit in a rough riding, weather permeable wooden box on wheels or on a horse or mule’s back. No matter how poor they may have been each surely had a lot more precious property than it was wise to try to bring with them.

DSC01234We have been living in our “Prairie Schooner”, DaKotR, for the past 7 years. It has been wonderful and has rarely been too small. Granted, much of that time was in our own back yard of our Sticks and Bricks house, but still, it has been a real pleasure to have the convenience of  our essentials at our fingertips while living year round in comfort. (Honestly, it does not look like this all the time.)

We have had a lot of practice for this journey. Few of the pioneers had more than a few months to prepare and I will tell you that it is not a simple or straightforward cookbook process.  Even with the experiences of hundreds that have gone before and have been expressed in their many books and Internet forums and blogs, it is not an easy process.

Refining our own check lists from those of many others was the easy part. Understanding how important or frivolous each line item would become, not so much.  Even with our years of experience living in our future environment there has been a huge amount of angst about the journey to come.

We know that we don’t know it all and that there will be a lot of unexpected cost and inconvenience… but we are committed to this journey. Our checklists have become part of us and our intended destinations are our bucket list.

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